Cory's Corner: Incentivizing Minority Hires Is A Bad Idea

The NFL wants to make sure that teams get the message that was sent in 2003 when the Rooney Rule was enacted.

I am completely on board with making sure there is a level playing field in regards to race. 

However, I am not sold on incentivizing hiring minorities as coaches or to hold jobs in the front office. 

The Rooney Rule is a great idea. Back in 2002, Tony Dungy and Dennis Green were both fired. Dungy just led Tampa Bay to a 9-7 record and advanced to the playoffs for the third straight season. Green led Minnesota to a 5-10 record that season, but that was the first losing season the Vikings suffered in the last 11 years. The Rooney Rule allowed Marvin Lewis to get a job in Cincinnati in 2003 and Mike Tomlin to be the head coach in Pittsburgh in 2007. 

Currently, Tomlin, Ron Rivera, Anthony Lynn and Brian Flores are the only minority head coaches in the NFL. 

Which is why the NFL wants to take it a step further. The NFL wants to make sure that teams get the message that was sent in 2003 when the Rooney Rule was enacted. Commissioner Roger Goodell wants to incentivize minority hires by moving up in the draft. 

So the question teams must ask themselves is if they can live with the decision of not moving up in the draft. For example, if a team hires a minority head coach, it would move up six spots in the third round in the following year's draft. Hiring a minority for the general manager job would create a 10-spot improvement. So, if a team did both and hired a minority head coach and general manager, they could move up 16 spots in the draft. That could mean a lot to a team that is still building and trying to come together. 

But that's not all. In the third year, a team's fourth-round pick would improve five spots. And it isn't just head coaches and general managers. Hiring a minority candidate as quarterbacks coach would net a team a compensatory fourth-round pick. And if a minority assistant becomes a coordinator with a different team, the old team gets a fifth-round compensatory pick and if a minority head coach or general manager go elsewhere, the old team nets a third-round compensatory pick. 

This is a tricky situation. Obviously the NFL wants minorities to get more of a chance, but if I'm a minority, am I really confident in my coaching or front office abilites or is the team just on a quest for better draft picks? Also, how is the NFL going to move teams up?

I like that the NFL is spotlighting this, but you cannot shoehorn a rule like this and expect it to be instant. The reason we are where we are is because of years and years of neglect. Minorities that rightly should've been hired long ago, were never given that chance and the cycle continued. Why you ask? Because people hire whom they know because it is easier as opposed to who may be the best qualified.

The problem is, it can't be about incentives," said nine-year NFL linebacker Sam Acho to ESPN Radio. "It's gotta be about giving the right coaches the right opportunities. The problem with the NFL is that there's so much cronyism; it's all about who you know."

The Rooney Rule made teams be accountable by at least forcing them to interview minority candidates. However, how many of those "candidates" knew they didn't have a real shot because the teams were just following the rule? So also, with the incentivizing. I'm wondering how many teams would be willing to bring a minority person aboard just to get the extra draft capital? If a team is on the cusp of the Super Bowl, I wouldn't expect a team do this.

And that raises a whole new issue: If bad teams keep recyling minority hires, are we really solving anything?

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Cory Jennerjohn is a graduate from UW-Oshkosh and has been in sports media for over 15 years. He was a co-host on "Clubhouse Live" and has also done various radio and TV work as well. He has written for newspapers, magazines and websites. He currently is a columnist for CHTV and also does various podcasts. He recently earned his Masters degree from the University of Iowa. He can be found on Twitter: @Coryjennerjohn

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Comments (50)

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Lphill's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:22 am

Bad idea , incentives I get but taking another teams spot in the draft order will only create more animosity.

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optimisticfan's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:33 am

Cory,
Some people would say that there doesn’t need to be any rules to help minorities. I am not one of them. The playing field is not level even with the current rules in place. Minority coaches already start from a disadvantage. But that is a different debate than the one you posed.

So if we are discussing how best to help address the minority coaching disparity, I appreciate your concerns but I disagree. From what I read the issue is both that coaches get hired by connections (coaching trees, who you know, etc) and some still inherent racial biases in owners/execs of some teams (though this is lessening some, the current rules have not markedly changed it).

I think the incentives seem reasonable because they mainly will help with hiring more assistant coaches when a minority coach candidate and another coach are seen as relatively equal. This gets more minority coaches into the pipeline so that they can get an opportunity to rise through the ranks. The level of compensatory picks and other incentives are not so tremendous that this will radically unlevel hires towards minority candidates. Likely just tip the scales a little to close the disparity gap.

Also head coaches will still be mainly hired on the merits. Moving up 6 spots in the 3rd is not a big factor. Teams just might interview minority assistant coaches more which allows an opportunity to see their merits. Some teams may have been biased towards overlooking those coaches. It helps counter some teams lazily having tunnel vision and only considering their “guys” that they liked when they watched them coach in a championship game or from a certain coaching tree etc

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Coldworld's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:52 am

While I don’t disagree with much of what you say, I can’t agree that this tinkering is the right way to go about it. It feels like a gimmick and messing with draft seems like the wrong way to go about it.

It seems to me that the problem is not at the head coach level primarily, but further down the tree. Where are the emerging candidates?

I would like to see a serious NFL program to finance minority individuals through the lower ranks of coaching, when times are hard. This includes offering colleges incentives to hire minorities and subsidizing posts.

Increase the pool and more good coaches are likely to emerge and place teams in the position of having to chose bigotry over the best candidate. Moreover, this approach would help more individuals pursue their chosen vocation. Increasing the talent pool irrespective of hue can only help the league.

The current idea will only encourage bottom feeder owners and teams. As you point out, good organizations will not be much swayed.

This sounds to me like the kind of idea a small cadre if older rich guys would come up with to make themselves look better without really impacting their profits. Get out there and do something real. Embarrassing!

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optimisticfan's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:50 am

Coldworld,
I agree with you that more significant initiatives/programs lower down would be better. After reading your well thought out points I am willing to change my opinion that you and Cory are right that the draft incentives may not be the best way. Silver lining is at least the NFL is still trying to address the issue and not just relying on the “you have to interview one minority coach” rule. Hopefully this turns out to be a step in the right direction even if not the best step and encourages more organizations to develop minority coaches at the position coaching ranks. I have hope that the NFL keeps evolving into better initiatives. MLF’s minority coaching fellowship hopefully helps the Packers develop some quality coaches

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nostradanus's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:43 am

This is a terrible idea. I am all for hiring the BEST PERSON AVAILABLE regardless of race. To incentivize teams to hire minorities with draft picks is really a slap in the face to minorities in general.
The NFL players are composed of 70-80% minorities as a rough guesstimate so obviously there is no bias in that arena, the best MAN wins the job not the best minority!
It is the same with coaching and to dangle draft picks and draft positions to one team as an incentive is very unfair to the other teams and really is saying the NFL fears lawsuits more than true equality.
It is the year 2020, we as civilized human beings should be past these draconian ideas of having to give special incentives to show how compassionate and caring we are.
These are professionals making business decisions that affect multi million dollar enterprises and throwing a bone to the minorities like this is disgraceful.
Hire on merit not based on skin color.
Damn people let’s get past this skin color thing already.
That is all...

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packerbackerjim's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:49 am

Kind of funny, most who want to get past “this skin thing” tend to be of the Caucasian variety.

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nostradanus's picture

May 19, 2020 at 08:30 am

Well Gee Jim easy for you to say. It just so happens my grandchildren are minorities. Do you think I look at them any different than I do anyone else. Get over it.

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packerbackerjim's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:41 am

It would seem that the “get over it” occurs when minorities might benefit from an affirmative option. Try not to take the observations personally.

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nostradanus's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:54 am

Noted Jim, also in the future don't judge a book by it's cover. I do sympathize with the struggles of minority coaching candidates but throwing them a bone this way seems like a slap in the face rather than a real solution.

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packerbackerjim's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:20 am

I think many (most?) people would love it if the country was post-racial, but that’s not the world in which we live. My initial observation stated this approach to incentivize minority hiring was a well-intentioned but dumb tool to address hiring disparities.

Please accept my apologies for any offense taken.

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nostradanus's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:41 am

No worries Jim and no offense taken and our opinions are not that much different really. Go Pack!

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packerbackerjim's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:47 am

Good intention, bad result. A team that fires the head coach usually has had a bad season. So that team would get to move ahead of other crummy teams. Move up 16 spots would put some into the second round. Dumb.

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stockholder's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:49 am

Rewarding Teams for Reverse Descrimination? Fire Goodell. Making sure there is a level playing field is in the best interest of everybody. Urge teams to do that. But don't be disrespectful to those who are more qualified. Favoritism is never a solution. Whats Next? I doubt this is a NFL crisis. Why make it one?

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Guam's picture

May 19, 2020 at 08:02 am

I always have to laugh when I see writers pontificate about "hiring someone you know is easier than hiring the best qualified candidate". The writer clearly has never had to hire someone for a significant job. It is very difficult to ascertain who is really "best qualified" from a group of all highly qualified candidates. Personal knowledge of one or more of the candidates reduces the risk of an erroneous decision and you lean on that personal knowledge when you choose from a group of highly qualified candidates. You do that because your selection reflects on your judgement and you don't want to make a mistake that tarnishes your reputation. Does that lead to accusations of cronyism - absolutely, but it is also a logical decision making process. I can almost guarantee that minority GM's, HC's, OC's, and DC's are using the same process to fill the slots below them because hiring highly qualified people they know gives them the best chance to be successful.

Not sure that the proposed incentive program will be enough to overcome the "cronyism" that is part of hiring for significant positions. The best plan will be to insure that the pipelines (coaching jobs below OC and DC) are filled with minorities who can then get to know senior executives and thereby eliminate much of the personal knowledge bias.

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CoryJennerjohn's picture

May 19, 2020 at 08:07 am

Hey Guam,

I've actually hired several people and I have taken the extra time to get the right person. Making a comfortable hire may seem OK at first, but friends tend to abuse privileges and take things for granted. Give me the right person that I don't know and who is also the harder worker any day.

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Guam's picture

May 19, 2020 at 02:48 pm

I appreciate the response Cory, but you missed an important issue. Were the positions significant (high level executive) within an organization? The NFL is targeting GM's, HC's, OC's and DC's - all highly compensated positions with important responsibilities. You usually employ an executive search firm to help find and vet these candidates and often have a number of very highly qualified people applying for the position. Differentiating between these candidates is often difficult and personal knowledge of a candidate is often helpful in making a decision (both ways).

This isn't about comfortable hires, this is about getting an important decision right for both the organization and you as the decision maker. You use every bit of information you can garner including personal knowledge.

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Bearmeat's picture

May 19, 2020 at 08:54 am

I am a professor at a large research university. I can tell you that my experiences in what is perhaps the most affected affirmative action "industry" in the country have taught me that Affirmative Action does not work. It causes as many problems as it solves. You can't legislate morality. It can't be done - at least not effectively. If the NFL wants to change the percentage of African American coaches and personnel members to more closely resemble the percentage of NFL players (which it should), then you have to work on eliminating the barriers to employment for someone trying to "break in" to a good-old-boys club. Insisting on interviews for AA purposes is the very worst way to do this. Go look at Tony Dungy's and Doug Whaley's comments on this for proof...

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DraftHobbyist's picture

May 19, 2020 at 01:14 pm

Why should the coaching staff look like the NFL players rather than the population? Also, I'd like to see what the racial makeup of the college game is, because that's really where candidates come from. Matt LaFleur never played in the NFL, so is it wrong that he became a Head Coach? He seems to be competent. Playing and coaching are different skills, and a lot of coaches are college players that never made it to the NFL. Matt LaFleur was a Saginaw Valley St QB, but that's it.

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DraftHobbyist's picture

May 19, 2020 at 01:14 pm

Why should the coaching staff look like the NFL players rather than the population? Also, I'd like to see what the racial makeup of the college game is, because that's really where candidates come from. Matt LaFleur never played in the NFL, so is it wrong that he became a Head Coach? He seems to be competent. Playing and coaching are different skills, and a lot of coaches are college players that never made it to the NFL. Matt LaFleur was a Saginaw Valley St QB, but that's it.

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Lare's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:24 am

IMO, the NFL is looking at this the wrong way. Pretty much every HC or GM starts at the bottom and works their way up the ladder before reaching the top job. If the NFL wants more minority people in higher positions, perhaps they could subsidize the salaries for minority hires in lower positions to get more working their way up the ladder.

The Packers currently look to have 9 of their 27 coaching positions held by minority individuals. I assume that is due to their knowledge & abilities instead of any effort at affirmative action.

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PatrickGB's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:49 am

Often times a minority coach is the one to best call out misbehaving minority players. My limited experience with minority coaches is that they are the ones who can call out all players to focus on the team first. A lot of minority players do that too. Right now the majority of players can be classified as members of a minority group. I applaud the effort to reward teams to hire more minority coaches. But I am undecided if what the NFL is doing is the right tool to make that happen. There is a reverse side to this. Questions will be raised about a promotion of a minority coach. Was he or she promoted because of his race or because of his or her skills?

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Leatherhead's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:51 am

I’m all for increasing opportunities, especially to people who’ve been denied. But I think this is a bad idea that sends a bad message. Let’s find a better way.

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Johnblood27's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:38 am

perhaps "Bad"dell and the league office should pass a resolution that there WILL be at least a 1/3 level of minority ownership in the NFL.

A random drawing cold be held to see which fat cats lose their franchises and a qualified pool of minority prospective owners could be developed and vetted through a racially integrated screening committee of current and former players and executives.

This stupid idea makes every bit as much sense as a dumazzed draft compensation scheme for minority "rights".

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Leatherhead's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:55 am

I am opposed to the idea that people should be punished for not agreeing, This whole bit about taking things away from fat cats.......I could never support that.

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dblbogey's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:21 am

Best man for the job. If they are going to do that, they should incentivise teams for hiring white cornerbacks and receivers. It's silliness.

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Tarynfor12's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:22 am

"Currently, Tomlin, Ron Rivera, Anthony Lynn and Brian Flores are the only minority head coaches in the NFL".

Can we list all the minority HC's since the Rooney Rule that have been HC's and simply failed? There have been 26 minority HC's in total with a few having been hired by multiple teams.

75% of the NFL players are minority and if anyone paid attention to the draft, the disparity in race drafted yearly, will make white players obsolete in ten years. This is counter to what is being argued in the HC realm.

I'm against racism, but I know I'll be called one here, but if the immediate defense of the black players being drafted are just better, fine, but the same is legit as to HC, perhaps the blacks just aren't better, though I will admit that the regurgitation of failed production is not limited to the minority report that started this comment.

If the minority argument is that there should be more minority HC's due to the over-whelming percentage number of minority players, than the argument is hypocritical and the direction is to have a minority dominated NFL at every level, a flip of the problem and not about equality based on merit.

Let's not be in denial when it comes to the draft, it's heavily race based in the selection process and College football makes sure it continues. How many non-minority players don't get a fair chance. The numbers, if daring to look, likely will show minority players are given much more a guarantee to play even if the better is a non-minority. Look on the sideline s of any football team in college. It is what it is, just don't deny such exists.

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Johnblood27's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:51 am

The assumption that a racial difference in player percentage should equate to a similar racial difference in coaches is misguided. Perhaps the qualifications are a little different from playing to coaching? Maybe take the percentage of all coaches that never played professionally and remove them from the racial difference lens when looking at the overall picture?

The simple fact that individuals that were never able to play the game at a high enough level to be professionals can rise to quite successful levels in coaching points to a HUGE fallacy in the player racial percentages and determination that coaching ranks should be reflective of those numbers.

a reversal of a "plantation" mentality is not a solution to the racial bias problem, it simply shifts the whip from one hand to another of a different color. Is that what the goal is? For some it clearly is. For a well intentioned majority is is not.

Perhaps clearly defining and standardizing the criteria for position qualification might be a better approach to giving equal opportunity to ACHIEVE the qualifications and be placed in a level position for consideration for the position?

Clearly ignoring better qualified candidates would be quite obvious and could be called out with penalties attached. The selective punishment of violators would be a better system than a blanket obligation to follow ill-defined process guidelines in the effort to achieve unbiased selections for coaching positions.

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The_Justicar's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:22 am

I don’t have any data on this....but based on my eye test and based on the majority of players being African American... coaching is a hard job. If you are a super successful nfl player it is highly likely you made millions upon millions of dollars and most people probably don’t want to then take a job paying far less than they used to earn and work miserable hours, which coaches do. I don’t want to infer, but I guess I am, that a higher percentage of white players don’t make it big and earn the massive contracts and Instead get into coaching, maybe impacting who is applying for coaching jobs. In addition, if the best players are predominately African American, they are also probably more likely to leave school early and not complete their college degree. Which is very common. Or, even if not a top pick, may leave college early due to family $ situations on a more frequent basis than other players. While I am not sure it is still the case at one point, in order to be a head coach for nearly all teams the job required a college degree (whether it is needed or not is another thing). But maybe I am wrong on both accounts.

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dobber's picture

May 19, 2020 at 10:56 am

If the NFL wants to increase women coaches and coaches of color, then they should subsidize it out of their deep pockets...which they could easily do and never feel the pinch. I have no problem with that. Offering draft picks in return is ridiculous. It's unrelated to the issue they're identifying and trying to address, and offering draft picks is no true commitment on the part of the league and has the chance of upsetting competitive balance based on actions unrelated to on-field performance and roster management. It's almost as bad an idea as (and akin to) MLB using the All-Star Game to decide who gets home field in the World Series.

If the league is truly committed to a program like this, then give every interested team an annual grant of $(agreed upon salary + benefits) to fund a renewable coaching position that meets NFL mandated criteria. That person is hired by the team and renewed/terminated by the team. Teams can choose to participate or not (and who wouldn't?). Boom. Done. Stay away from draft picks.

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Leatherhead's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:11 am

Why stop with women and minorities? Why not encouraging LGBT hiring? Ex-wife beaters? People with criminal records? Why don’t we just say “these are the outcomes we want “ and then just do it?

Social engineering is difficult, and there can be many unintended consequences. The answers, IMO, will be found in our hearts and minds and not in legislation. It’s been 65 years since segregation was made illegal, 55 years since the Civil Rights Act. Generations. If minorities are being unfairly held back in the NFL, I don’t think it’s because of the rules or the law.

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Leatherhead's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:11 am

Why stop with women and minorities? Why not encouraging LGBT hiring? Ex-wife beaters? People with criminal records? Why don’t we just say “these are the outcomes we want “ and then just do it?

Social engineering is difficult, and there can be many unintended consequences. The answers, IMO, will be found in our hearts and minds and not in legislation. It’s been 65 years since segregation was made illegal, 55 years since the Civil Rights Act. Generations. If minorities are being unfairly held back in the NFL, I don’t think it’s because of the rules or the law.

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Since'61's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:14 am

Utilizing the draft to incentive hiring practices is a dangerous and unnecessary precedent. A team which believes it is one player away from the SB might hire a minority coach just to move up in the draft to try to get that player. The league could end up making the better teams better which is the opposite of how the draft order should work.

I’m a firm believer in hiring the best qualified candidates which is why my business partner and I used an outside Executive search firm to recruit and interview job candidates including interviewing our own internal candidates while we were still directly involved with our company. We always made the final decision on who we would hire/promote into a job opening but an outside 3rd party firm presented the candidates to us in order of who they determined to be best qualified without any bias.

The NFL should take a similar approach. They should use an outside firm to continually interview and conduct due diligence on candidates for coaching and GM positions. When an opening occurs they present the best qualified candidates to the team with the opening and the team makes the decision who to hire from the candidates provided.

Would the owners and current GMs support this approach? Probably not. But if they are looking to inject fairness and reduce bias this approach could at least be a step in that direction. It’s better than manipulating the draft process. Once a team moves up in the draft and gets their player what is to prevent them from firing the minority coach they hired to move up in the draft.

The NFL is allegedly a professional organization, it’s long overdue for them to act like one. Stay well. Thanks, Since ‘61

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dobber's picture

May 19, 2020 at 07:22 pm

In all likelihood, the league offices probably received a couple sub-par market reports where certain demographics polled disfavorably with regard to their view of the league and race. Money is the only thing that really motivates these guys, and they think they're losing $$...or not making as much as they could.

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Since'61's picture

May 19, 2020 at 09:15 pm

Good point Dobber. The league is only interested in the color of money. Thanks, Since ‘61

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Coldworld's picture

May 20, 2020 at 07:48 am

This move does nothing for the economics of trying to make it as a football coach. As such it is window dressing. The NFL isn’t serious until lit tackles that aspect, which will take working with the NCAA. Whatever the minority, let talent be able to afford to train and talent will become more representative.

This is a dinosaur move by an organization commuted only to gimmicks not change. Want to make the game better? Broaden your talent pool not tinker with the draft.

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Alberta_Packer's picture

May 19, 2020 at 12:07 pm

Linking minority hires to draft choices seems like a gimmick - certainly an incompatible relationship. It could also reduce decision making from a qualitative basis to a quantitative one. Perhaps a better concept already exists - a minority coaching fellowship (as established by Matt LaFleur) - which has permitted the Packers to hire Ruvell Martin. Maybe expansion of the concept is all that is necessary - with the NFL providing a fellowship fund so that each team can hire at least one minority coach per year - as selected by the Head Coach - to ensure the mentoring relationship. In this way new/fresh minority coaching talent can be built from the bottom up rather than the top down - which is a more sustainable model.

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splitpea1's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:40 am

This idea is a load of crap. Hiring a minority candidate just for the sake of moving up a few spots in the draft is stupid. There's no need to go any further than the Rooney Rule. Owners, GMs, and coaches are always going to hire the candidates best suited to their purposes, and that 's the way it should be. And if certain parties don't like it, they can always find jobs somewhere else--though I doubt the pay will be as good.

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gkarl's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:43 am

This is an attempt to provide an immediate fix to an age old problem. I doubt this plan will ultimately prove any more successful than Rooney because it doesn't really address the underlying problems.

Society is changing and so will the NFL, but at a glacial pace. We ain't fixing this one overnite.

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The_Justicar's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:44 am

This reminds me a little of some comments I heard from Michael Irving many years ago. Bring a packers fan I ,uh, greatly dislike Irving. But what he said is mentioned by the writer in some form. About 15 years ago, Irving was asked and/or commenting on Jerry Jones. Something to the effect that since Jerry hires another white head coach, did he think Jerry was a racist. He answered no. He said Jerry, like many other people, hire who they know. People who they may run into within their circles. People who are referred to them from people within their circles. People they feel comfortable with. Doesn’t make him racist. Jerry hands with other billionaires. Jerry runs into people at his church. His place of business. The clubs where billionaires hang. Where Jerry lives and walks his dog is probably not a very diverse neighborhood. But neither are many neighborhoods (whether a black neighborhood or Latin or Chinese or white). It’s just common. Irving went on to say no, he doesn’t think Jerry is a racist.

After listening Irving on the radio (I lived in Miami and he was on often as an ex Miami hurricane player) I took a look across the company I worked for and it was kind of amazing how my company compared to what Irving said. In one department, cash, which was run by an African American, about 80% of every employee was African American. In customer service, it was run by a Cuban and 90 percent of her team was Latin (not surprising in Miami). In the default legal group, the manager was from Jamaica. More than half her entire team was Jamaican. In looking at the most senior exec team - almost all were Jewish. In taking in Irving’s quote and applied to my company...in Miami, while it is a diverse city, the majority by far are Latin. Yet each of these departments had a predominate race in line with the manager of each department. There a few Jamaicans in Miami yet the department managed by a Jamaican had mostly Jamaican. Because she was racist? No, because people at her church and grocery story and neighbors know each other and refer friends and family to her. In her circle. Just like Jerry Jones. The owner of my firm wasn’t a bigot because most of the board were Jewish. They all went to the same Temple and same Jewish schools. That is who they know.

Anyway, thought I would share some of what I remember Irving saying and how it made me look at my firm at that time and applied it to a real live scenario. I bring it up because while I am not a fan of affirmative action...I don’t know of a way to get around the “who you know” when it comes to job hunting, especially in coaching.

On a side note...the largest department at my firm...it was the only department that had a large portion of its pay based on monthly and quarterly incentives. You could more than double and even triple your annual salary based solely on monthly performance. This department had the widest range of every race - black, Jewish, white, Latin, Asian, etc. no other department had that kind of diversity. I found that interesting since it was the only group to get paid solely on performance metrics on a monthly basis. It was also the department that had the highest rate of attendance- most of them never missed a day of work for being sick. Just a side note.

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DraftHobbyist's picture

May 19, 2020 at 11:52 am

This racist proposal is a terrible one. No team is going to hire coaches based on improving a 3rd rounder 6 or 10 spots. The only thing this will do is give a competitive advantage to teams run by minorities, and maybe that's the issue the NFL wants to solve. You see, as recently as 2018, 7 Black Head Coaches were hired. That's over 1/5th of the teams, which is almost twice the representation they should've have given the broader population. Did anybody complain about the over-representation? No. But when 5 of those coaches failed and got fired, we were left with only 2 left. Now we have 4 minority coaches total. Yes, that's a slight under-representation, but it's not as bad as people make it out to be given how volatile hiring and firing minority coaches can be. We could have 3 hired in one year, the % would jump by 10%. Will the NFL get rid of the rule then? I doubt it. They'll just keep discriminating against White coaches. This proposal isn't even legal. It's literally unconstitutional and would get the NFL and the teams sued.

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wildbill's picture

May 19, 2020 at 12:54 pm

Nobody cry’s when a white coach with a losing record gets fired or not hired. When you set quotas that don’t reflect reality you will always be disappointed. Reverse discrimination is still discrimination but I guess the rule of thumb is you can’t decriminalize against whites as we were all born with a silver spoon in our mouths and a red carpet to any great paying job we want.

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greenandgoldguy's picture

May 19, 2020 at 01:36 pm

Oh yeah right, let's hire a minority to get higher draft picks even if he sucks at what he was hired for. Stupid. The owners are going to hire whoever the hell they want to hire, no matter what ethnicity they are period. They are gonna hire the guy they feel is most qualified for the job. I think this whole hire the minority thing is bullshit. We know damn well that pro athletes make certain teams in certain sports because they are good at that sport. No one was bitching and complaining when 95% of the NBA at one time was black were they? Get off it already. Have you checked out MLB lately? It's hard to find a black or a white guy on any team, they are mostly Latin. Is anybody wining about that?

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Since91's picture

May 19, 2020 at 03:40 pm

Dumb Dumb Dumb!

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Laidar's picture

May 19, 2020 at 03:57 pm

Thanks for the info

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Bure9620's picture

May 20, 2020 at 01:04 am

I think it could be beneficial to have a bottom up and not top down approach. Incentives for teams hiring a minority coach really make no sense. Why not have a system of a bottom up strategy. Maybe a development system that helps young minorities whom are interested in coaching a development system which allows them to grow so when they are hired as position coaches, coordinators and eventually head coaches they then ready to have success. Same goes for player personnel. How many black GMs are there??

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AlexHamilton20's picture

May 20, 2020 at 04:23 am

Bad result!

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Duneslick's picture

May 20, 2020 at 12:41 pm

Total BS by the liberal Goodell. Taking someone because they are a minority is racist whether they are black or white or asian ETC. To reward teams to be racist is wrong.

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Point-Packer's picture

May 20, 2020 at 02:27 pm

Why hire minority candidates when you can hire brilliant old white guys like Ron Zook and Shawn Slocum?.....

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fish's picture

May 20, 2020 at 05:42 pm

You cannot end discrimination by discriminating.

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Ferrari-Driver's picture

May 23, 2020 at 10:59 am

Every owner wants to win and wants that Lombardi Trophy. Current NFL rosters have perhaps 70 percent or even more Black players and few other minority groups represented which should indicate that NFL owners, just like those in major businesses want the most talented people on their team whether is it a football team or a major manufacturing firm. It should stand to reason that owners are likely to select coaches and managers for their respective organizations in a like fashion. If I were a talented potential head coach I would certainly be disappointed that another less talented potential head coach were hired over me simply because I fail to have the correct color on my skin.

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