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Jolly Released From Texas Prison

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Jolly Released From Texas Prison

Former Packers defensive lineman Johnny Jolly has been released from a Texas jail after a judge granted Jolly "shock probation" for the next 10 years, according to ABC 13 News in Houston (KTRK).

Jolly was in prison on a six-year sentence after multiple arrests relating to his addiction to the drug codeine.

According to KTRK, shock probation "allows for certain convicts to be released early on probation after experiencing the shock or trauma of being in jail." Only first-time offenders are eligible.

Now, instead of serving the rest of his six-year sentence, Jolly will be on probation for 10 years and also serve 200 hours of community service.

Jolly contended that he was not a threat to society but needed help outside of prison for his addiction to codeine.

"Once you get addicted to it, you're in the mindset where you don't think you going to get caught. or you don't feel like you're going to get in trouble," said Jolly. "And that's just the drug talking to you."

Jolly was drafted by the Packers in the sixth round of the 2006 draft. He started all 32 games between 2008 and '09 before being suspended for all 16 games of the 2010 season.
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Fan friendly comments only: off Comments (52) This filter will hide comments which have ratio of 5 to 1 down-vote to up-vote.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

So people go to prison and get granted extremely early release because they got 'scurred in thur'??? Isn't that kinda what the clink is all about? WTF-over! Laughable.

GBP 4 LIFE

ohenry78's picture

I'd rather his spot in jail be open for someone who has done something more serious, like murder or robbery or something. Non-violent drug crimes should spend as little time in jail as possible.

jeremy's picture

Not to mention the tax burden of incarceration.

PresidentRaygun's picture

I wish more brain-dead Americans had this view.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

I generally agree with that sentiment. The fact is a judge sentenced him to six yrs. And he got out because prison was shocking to him? Imagine how shocking it must be if you're not the size of a bus with catlike agility, and people aren't scared of you! Just seems like a WEAK excuse to me.

Tommyboy's picture

"scurred in thur." I just laughed. True story.

FITZCORE1252's picture

Nice!

Brad Stanley's picture

I can only wonder what the Packers line would be like today had Jolly been able to stay straight and grow off his breakout year he had prior to his arrest.

Hope he gets the help he needs.

yogamon's picture

It's nice to see that some folks just lack the empathy gene; this happily assures us that there will always be executioners available for state sponsored killings.

Anthony's picture

Agreed. It's messed up people can't see things from others' perspective.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

I'll gladly volunteer! If a jury of my peers says somebody is guilty of a twisted crime, and no longer needs to breathe my air... You betcha! Somebody in this country has to have the stones to get er did. Glad to help.

FITZCORE1252's picture

But you just do your yoga... and let 'us' handle it! L-O-L

Anthony's picture

I don't think you understand why so many people dislike the drug laws in this country. This is the exact reason. Instead of putting someone in jail or fining someone, why not give him serious help? Putting them in jail only makes the drug addiction stop for a short while.

redlights's picture

Its because he was formulating and delivering drugs. The amount of codeine that he was caught with, is WAY more than a user would have. He is/was not only ruining his life, but that of others, as well.

I agree with the poster who predicted trouble for Jolly within two months. Hope I'm wrong.

PackersRS's picture

Yep. It wasn't because of drug use he was in jail.

There is no good, social motive for Jolly to be trafficking. It wasn't because he was addicted. It wasn't because he was poor.

He had all that was necessary not to sell drugs. Yet he did it recreationally.

The state should help people, but save it for people who trully need it, and there are plenty. But Jolly isn't one of them.

ppabich's picture

If you think he was distributing, then you have NO idea what you are talking about. He was never charged with intent to distribute, and do you know how much 200 grams of codeine cough syrup is? It's an 8 oz bottle. That's it, enough for maybe you and a couple of your friends. Not enough to distribute.

Ceallaigh's picture

Just to put it in perspective for ppabich how much Johny Jolly was caught with. For the record it was 600 grams. Your decimal point is shifted quite a bit.

Codeine syrup has 15 MILLIgrams (0.015 grams) per 5 milliliters (teaspoon). Each ounce is 30 ml, then 8 ounces has 0.72 grams of codeine in it.

To have 600 grams of codeine, he would have had to have the equivalent of 6666 ounces. To put that in perspective, that's the same as 555 pop cans of codeine if it was in syrup form. (since it would be pretty hard to cart around that type of volume, I suspect he had codeine in powder, not cough syrup form.)

That is a crap ton of codeine. That isn't personal consumption, that's a cottage industry.

ppabich's picture

Let me put this in perspective for Ceallaigh to understand. There is no such thing as a powder that's 100% codeine. And if you knew anything about Houston culture, Jolly was drinking "lean". Which is a drink made up from Codeine cough syrup, and soda. Understand that it is indisputable that Jolly's addiction was to cough syrup. In every single police report, there was never a mention of a power. Only a "liquid containing codeine." Therefore it is painfully obvious that was the 200 grams is referring to was the total mass of the liquid that contained codeine, not the total codeine content.

If he had 200 grams of codeine that would equate to over 70 bottles of cough syrup, and if he had that much of the substance he would have gotten far more than a possession charge.

ppabich's picture

By the way the first arrest was for 200 grams.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

I totally understand actually, I'm all for the decriminalization of weed, have been for years for many reasons. I know quite a few people with their green cards in Wa state, and I have zero issues with it. But not all drugs are created equal, and some are downright evil. And I think you could kick any habit in six years... That's not a short while.

Stevie B's picture

If the death penalty is state sanctioned killing, what is imprisonment? State sanctioned kidnapping?

Point Packer's picture

Ol' Johnny Jolly Rancher in a 12 ounce Sprite mixed with codeine better make some new friends.

cow42's picture

get him.
not joking.

Anthony's picture

I actually agree, regardless of if you're joking or not. Jolly is only 29 which isn't really old for a d-lineman. He has plenty of gas left in the tank, and if he can recommit himself to football, he could return to his promise he had before. The Jolly I remember was him blocking several kicks and deflecting several passes, as well as being a decent pass rusher. I'd rather have him than Neal or Hargrove. Even though he probably won't play early this year, I'm sure he'd be ready by mid-season if the Packers could get his suspension lifted and could get in shape by midseason. Or, at the worst, have him come in after this season. And yes, I'm dead serious. He was one of my favorite Packers before he got in trouble. Was such a hard worker and performed well.

Mojo's picture

And if they take Jolly back they can time the return of their suspended D-lineman based on some kind of spooky arithmetic progression. Neal at four games, Hargrove at eight and Jolly at 16. In fact, slowly working in fresh, energetic, motivated post-suspension D-lineman throughout the season will become the new modus operandi around the league.

cow42's picture

would save a lot of $ to only have to pay guys for partial seasons.

i'm sure tt's had this planned all along.

Point Packer's picture

How about we get Johnny back on the team and change our name to the Oakland Raiders? Sound like a good plan?

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

Wouldn't JJ be suspended for awhile himself if he attempted a comeback?

Ruppert's picture

That's a good question. He got suspended for a year already. What's next on the suspension list after a year? I wouldn't doubt if it would be totally up to Goodell in some type of trial or hearing.

Bring Jolly in. He's more worthy of a roster spot than (insert the name of anybody signed in the last week for roster spots 77 through 90). Pretty much agree with everything you said on this topic, Fitz. Have one on me.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

All for it. Once people realize the whole "Packer People" thing is a joke... They'd be all for it too. Good football player, not the best person... Really don't care... Go tackle somebody.

Rocky70's picture

You need to read another perspective from 25 years ago.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1066003/index...

I doubt most PackFans will admit that the Pack Org is at a 100% level when discussing "Packer People", but there are degrees to everything. My opinion (developed over several decades) is that they actually do try harder than most sports franchises. Not hardly perfect but better than most.

Normthe1's picture

Nice post mate, thanks for posting that article.

For someone like me who didn't grow up a Packer supporter or even in the USA, its good to read a little bit of history of the team that I didn't know.

Cheers!

PackersRS's picture

I actually agree completely with Rocky.

I'll add that Packer People isn't about clean guys, perfect guys. They do get it wrong now and then but Packer People is more about notion of self sacrifice and team work than it is about being a model citizen.

Ray Lewis stabbed (allegedly) a guy, but he would be Packer People. Haynesworth, with only minor legal incidents, would not.

"Packer People" is all about cost-benefit.

jim's picture

Interesting development! I would think that the league would suspend him for some time having had a felony conviction, but, if available and IF he can work himself back into shape that he was in before, this could be a real bonanza for the pack.

Woodson4president's picture

Theres a better chance Hawk retires as a packer than JJ comin back to play. I mean lets be honest its a dumb idea.

Lucky953's picture

I think Michael Vick now has a well-paying job and is paying taxes rather than using them up. Most felons can't find jobs once they've served their time.

PackersRS's picture

Yeah, it's not a popular notion, but, to me, a penal system should be guided by efficiency and not moral justice. It may not be better for an individual case, but it's better for the whole picture.

It's obvious that Jolly is much, much more productive to society out of prison. As long as he's not dealing...

Mojo's picture

Totally disagree with you on this one RS. IMO, justice is by far the overriding factor in sentencing a person. I don't know specifically about the Jolly case, but the person he hurt the most was himself, so I'm OK with a reduced sentence(although only 6 months out of 6 years seems ridiculous). He may have also perjured himself, basically lying about his role in earlier transgressions(and people don't often realize that if people don't tell the truth in court - the whole system is worthless). But overall, Jolly screwed himself the most during his run-ins with the law and with a short prison sentence and loss of money and career, justice was served.

However, in cases where people harm innocent others in connection with their malfeasance, justice should be much more swift and harsh. I find it odd how many people focus on the cost of incarceration and ignore the need for justice for victims who often are unable to speak for themselves or are harmed for life. The greatest injustice of all is attached to murder victims who not only lose their most precious gift - their life - but obviously can't speak-out about the totally unfair nature of the situation. It's up to us to give them justice, and if it cost something in dollars, I'm willing to do it.

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

A-FRIGGIN-MEN

Mojo's picture

RS, without getting into the ambiguities of the term "justice", I would like to comment on how many people would base the length of an offenders sentence on cost. To me, the length of a sentence should be based on the following considerations with the most important listed first:

1.) Recompense (justice) for the victim(recompense can consist of many things, including a forfeiture of the offenders property, time or perhaps life).

2.) Use as a deterrent. (Most people don't like the thought of going to jail (don't do the crime if you can't do the time)).

3.) Safety threat to the general public. (I think this reason is the most often cited as a reason to put and retain someone in prison - but is still not the best).

4.) Likelihood of prisoner rehab. (Yup, if the crime isn't too heinous (like murder, rape or vicious crimes on another individual), then consideration should be given to reducing a sentence if the prisoner is truly repentant and not likely to repeat.)

5.) Cost - should be the least important of considerations, but is important when the above four are decided upon first.

PackersRS's picture

Hmn. I swear I had finished my Criminology course in college...

In all seriousness, Mojo, lenght of sentence is a reflection of the legal principles employed when structuring a penal code, and most legal codes don't take recompence for the victim into consideration, at all, when doing it.

I could go into detail why, but it would take a lot...

PackersRS's picture

Two different things. You're talking about ruling, I'm talking about legislating and executing sentences.

The difference is much more profound in the penal system of my country (Brazil) than it is in yours, but it's there nonetheless.

As for justice, justice is peculiar to each individual. What is just for me might not be just for you. Personally I don't believe that the state should have the power to kill (execute) a person. That's the difficulty in using moral justice as the primary factor.

BTW, most countries claim justice is their guideline, but it's not exactly like that. Starting with stabilishing the monetary value for bail.

Again, not a very popular point of view, and I understand why you disagree. But I believe a just system is utopia, the aim should be for a more just system...

FITZCORE1252's EVO's picture

So you view a "just system" kinda like I view the unicorn that is "Packer People". I get your view. In a perfect world, sure... But there's no way of actually pulling it off in this non-perfect world.

PackersRS's picture

I see the contrary, Fitz. What I'm saying does happen. Jolly's case is a perfect example. Do you think this happens with every person charged with felony? Absolutely not. Where's the justice in that?

The only reason he got this "shock probation" is because of his notoriety. Because the chances of him getting a job outside are very good.

What I don't see the possibility of happening in today's world is a penal system that stabilishes fair rulings for everybody. If you can't happen but err, then err on the side of overall efficiency.

It's best for society that rich guys like Jolly stay productive, outside of prison.

Mojo's picture

Opps, originally attached to wrong reply above.

RS, without getting into the ambiguities of the term “justice”, I would like to comment on how many people would base the length of an offenders sentence on cost. To me, the length of a sentence should be based on the following considerations with the most important listed first:

1.) Recompense (justice) for the victim(recompense can consist of many things, including a forfeiture of the offenders property, time or perhaps life).

2.) Use as a deterrent. (Most people don’t like the thought of going to jail (don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time)).

3.) Safety threat to the general public. (I think this reason is the most often cited as a reason to put and retain someone in prison – but is still not the best).

4.) Likelihood of prisoner rehab. (Yup, if the crime isn’t too heinous (like murder, rape or vicious crimes on another individual), then consideration should be given to reducing a sentence if the prisoner is truly repentant and not likely to repeat.)

5.) Cost – should be the least important of considerations, but is important when the above four are decided upon first.

Chad Toporski's picture

Drugs addictions cannot be cured by the state. The best it can do is get someone "clean" before sending them back out into society. But even without the physical addiction, it doesn't take much for someone to get back into the habit.

It takes personal discipline and willpower to be rid of drugs. And that's something no jail or legal mandate can provide.

packsmack25's picture

I just hope whomever is giving him guidance tells him to get a new phone and include NONE of his old friends in the contacts.

Point Packer's picture

Or the first thing he'll do is celebrate his freedom with a nice cold glass of Purple Draaank.

Nononsense's picture

He needs to go to rehab and move away from Texas that would be my advice for him.

Barry's picture

Good luck to him. Hope he gets the help he needs. Could the Pack bring him into camp as part of his rehab as a non player to keep him occupied and his off days he could talk to school kids in Wisconsin about the dangers of drugs?

Point Packer's picture

Johnny Jolly would be amongst the last in a large pool of people that I wouldn't want talking to my 12 year old about the dangers of drugs.

Barry's picture

I believe it was prescription drugs he was addicted to.Not class A. Big difference.

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